O’Poupon Corned Beef Hash and Eggs

Riddle: What do you get when an Englishman walks into a kitchen and whips up an Irish American breakfast with a little Frenchie zing? Answer: A multi-cultural culinary mash-up! My husband David did just that. He offered to make breakfast, as he so often does, and presented me with his creation. When he asked what I thought, all he could make out between huge mouthfuls was, “Brilliant, just brilliant!” It was an oh-my-gosh-I-could-eat-this-for-breakfast-every-day kind of dish! So David says, “Do you want my recipe?” “Oh Yes!”, I say. “I want your recipe!” And so will you all!

Corned beef is considered by many to be an Irish American treat but it does have it’s roots in Ireland, for the wealthier Irish that is. The poor Irish couldn’t afford beef. They were pork and lamb eaters. Most of them raised a pig, fattened it up and then sold it off to pay the rent and buy a bit of bacon. Irish bacon, similar to Canadian bacon, was the preferred meat, since it was cheap back in Ireland.

But when the Irish immigrants arrived in America, beef was the inexpensive meat of choice and pork was too expensive for the new Irish immigrants to afford. Corned beef is salt-cured beef. The term “corned” comes from the treatment of the meat with large grained rock salt, also called “corns” of salt. Members of the Irish working class in New York City frequented Jewish delis and lunch carts, and it was there they tasted corned beef for the first time. In America, a person might be poor, but he or she could eat like a king and enjoy cheap and easy to prepare corned beef! 

One of the great things about the St Patrick’s Day feast at our house is the leftover corned beef. For years I have made more of a traditional style corned beef hash with the leftovers. Leave it to my husband, who is a one of a kind recipe himself (said with great affection), to create an easy recipe with so many layers of complex flavors. The crispy outside and creamy inside of the potato, paired with the salty bite from the corned beef and the zingy flavor of the Grey Poupon sauce makes his hash a completely fantastic breakfast. Perfect in every bite! This will be the only corned beef hash recipe used in our house from now on! Oh yes, it is that good!

Corned Beef Hash and Eggs Ingredients

O’Poupon Corned Beef Hash and Eggs (and yes, the name is his own idea too!) 

O'Poupon Sauce

In a small bowl, whisk together the mustard, sour cream and water. Set aside for later. The “secret sauce!”

Start to brown potatoes

Melt butter in skillet, add potatoes and toss to coat in the butter. Let potatoes brown on one side and then stir to cook the other sides. They will continue to brown as the next ingredients are added. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Add the celery and shallot

Once potatoes have a medium brown color, add the shallots and celery. Cook for 2 minutes to slightly soften the veggies. David says the celery needs to have a little crunch to it so it doesn’t get lost in the mix of characters.

Add corned beef to pan

Add the corned beef and cook for another 1-2 minutes to heat through and form more crustiness on the potatoes and meat.

Add O'Poupon sauce

Slowly add half of the mustard sour cream mixture and stir to combine.  The potatoes will absorb the liquid quickly. Add the rest of the mixture, stir and then let the potatoes cook without stirring to create a little more crust on the potatoes. Turn the heat down to low and keep the potatoes warm while the eggs are cooking.

Griddle cook the eggs

On a griddle or in a skillet, crack 2 eggs and cook until the center just starts to firm up.  (use a little pat of butter if you aren’t using a good non-stick pan) “Sunny side up” eggs are what you are looking for. Don’t flip the eggs.

David's trick

David’s little trick is to put a lid over the griddle (or pan) and put a little water on the pan, about a tablespoon or so, to create stream to gently cook the eggs. The yolks need to be soft so they will run over the corned beef hash making another sort of sauce. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Plate the Corned Beef Hash and Eggs

To Plate: Make a mound of the corned beef hash in the center of the plate. Place one egg on top of the hash and sprinkle with some chives.

Egg Drool

The Grey Poupon sauce coupled with the egg yolk drooling down over the potatoes is the most amazing flavor combo!

Perfect Bite

As we savor our plate of O’Poupon Corned Beef Hash, David says in his best Irish brogue, “Top of the morning to you!” “And the rest of the day to you”, I say. All is well for this Irish American girl!

O’Poupon Corned Beef Hash and Eggs
Serves 2
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Prep Time
5 min
Cook Time
10 min
Total Time
15 min
Prep Time
5 min
Cook Time
10 min
Total Time
15 min
324 calories
39 g
207 g
14 g
11 g
7 g
343 g
266 g
1 g
0 g
6 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
343g
Servings
2
Amount Per Serving
Calories 324
Calories from Fat 125
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 14g
22%
Saturated Fat 7g
34%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 2g
Monounsaturated Fat 4g
Cholesterol 207mg
69%
Sodium 266mg
11%
Total Carbohydrates 39g
13%
Dietary Fiber 4g
15%
Sugars 1g
Protein 11g
Vitamin A
14%
Vitamin C
31%
Calcium
8%
Iron
18%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 1 1/2 teaspoons Grey Poupon Dijon mustard
  2. 1 1/2 Tablespoons sour cream
  3. 1/3 cup water
  4. 1 tablespoon butter
  5. 2 cups Ore-Ida Diced Hash Brown Potatoes
  6. 1 stalk celery, small dice
  7. 1 small shallot, small dice
  8. 3/4 cup cubed corned beef
  9. 2 eggs
  10. Salt and pepper to taste
  11. 1 tablespoon chopped chives
Instructions
  1. In a small bowl, whisk together the mustard, sour cream and water. Set aside for later.
  2. Melt butter in skillet, add potatoes and toss to coat in the butter. Let potatoes brown on one side and then stir to cook the other sides. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
  3. Once potatoes have a medium brown color, add the shallots and celery. Cook for 2 minutes to soften the veggies.
  4. Add the corned beef and cook for another 1-2 minutes to heat through.
  5. Slowly add half of the mustard sour cream mixture and stir the combine. The potatoes will absorb the liquid quickly. Add the rest of the mixture, stir and then let the potatoes cook without stirring to create a little crust on the potatoes.
  6. Turn the heat down to low and keep the potatoes warm while the eggs are cooking.
  7. On a griddle or in a skillet, crack 2 eggs and cook until the center just starts to firm up. (use a little pat of butter if you aren't using a good non-stick pan) “Sunny side up” eggs are what you are looking for. Don’t flip the eggs.
  8. Put a lid over the griddle (or pan) then put a little water on the pan, about a tablespoon or so, to create stream to gently cook the eggs.The yolks need to be soft so they will run over the corned beef hash making another sort of sauce. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
  9. To Plate: Make a mound of the corned beef hash in the center of the plate. Place one egg on top of the hash and sprinkle with some chives.
beta
calories
324
fat
14g
protein
11g
carbs
39g
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Life of the Party Always! http://lifeofthepartyalways.com/
 

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